Kim Hein

Kim Hein (Ncube-Hein) is a graduate of the University of Adelaide (Australia) with a Bachelor of Science (Hons) in Economic Geology, and was the 1989 recipient of the Ralph Tate Medal for Geology and the 1989 Homestake Prize for Economic Geology.

She gained her PhD from the University of Tasmania (Australia) in 1995 and undertook research at the Universiteit Utrecht from 2000 to 2004. In 2004 she accepted the Chamber of Mines Chair and Professorship of Mining Geology at the University of the Witwatersrand Johannesburg and was appointed Professional Professor at Wits in 2012. Kim is actively involved in geoscience research and education in South Africa and francophone West Africa.


Prof Hein served as a

  • Member of Senate of the University of the Witwatersrand Johannesburg (2004-current).
  • Member of the International Union of Geological Sciences (IUGS) Task Group on Tectonics and Structural Geology (TecTask).
  • Fellow of the Geological Society of South Africa (2005-current).
  • Trustee of the ”Making a Difference through Education in Alexandra Township Trust (MADE in Alex Trust)” (2005-2010)

She has many years of experience in the fields of metals exploration and mining, research and development, management, and geoscience education. She has specialised on the applied structural geology, exploration and mining of Archaean and Proterozoic gold deposits in Australia and West Africa. She is currently a member of the Senior Executive Team in the prestigious AMIRA WAXI P934 project (West Africa Exploration Initiative). She is actively involved in research in the Witwatersrand basin of South Africa.

Kim has held field, project, research and senior geology positions with the major mining companies including Billiton-Zapopan, Zapopan NL, WMC Resources Limited, North Limited, and Energy Resources of Australia. Her education portfolio includes education management, development of mentoring programs for the Edward De Bono Institute in Australia, and student empowerment training and educational psychology.